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Here it is! The last advisory on what used to be Hurricane Nate

Here it is! The last advisory on what used to be Hurricane Nate
Posted: Oct 8, 2017
Categories: Headlines, Weather
Comments: 0

...HEAVY RAINFALL SPREADING INLAND AS NATE BECOMES A TROPICAL
DEPRESSION...
...FUTURE ADVISORIES WILL BE ISSUED BY THE WEATHER PREDICTION
CENTER...

SUMMARY OF 1000 AM INFORMATION
-----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...33.1N 87.3W
ABOUT 40 MI...65 KM SW OF BIRMINGHAM ALABAMA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...35 MPH...55 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...NNE OR 30 DEGREES AT 24 MPH...39 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...996 MB...29.42 INCHES

WATCHES AND WARNINGS
--------------------
CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY:

All coastal warnings have been discontinued.

SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT:

There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect.

DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOK
------------------------------
At 1000 AM the center of Tropical Depression Nate
was located near latitude 33.1 North, longitude 87.3 West. The
depression is moving toward the north-northeast near 24 mph (39
km/h). A turn toward the northeast with an increase in forward
speed is expected during the next couple of days. On the forecast
track, Nate's center will continue to move inland across the Deep
South, Tennessee Valley, and central Appalachian Mountains through
Monday.

Surface observations indicate that the maximum sustained winds have
decreased to near 35 mph (55 km/h) with higher gusts. Little change
in strength is predicted during the next couple of days, but Nate
is forecast to become post-tropical on Monday or Tuesday.

The estimated minimum central pressure is 996 mb (29.42 inches).

The center of Nate continues to move quickly north-northeastward
over central Alabama. Moderate westerly shear has caused most of
the deep convection and heavy rainfall to be displaced to the east
and northeast of the center, and surface observations show that
Nate has continued to rapidly weaken. Wind gusts to tropical-storm
strength are still occurring over portions of Alabama and the
Florida Panhandle, but there are no recent reports of sustained
tropical-storm-force winds. Therefore, Nate is now a 30-kt
tropical depression. Nate is expected to become a remnant low on
Monday, and extratropical by Tuesday before it is absorbed by
frontal system. The intensity foreast keeps the wind speed around
30 kt during the next 48 hours, since winds are expected to increase
along the mid-Atlantic coast and southern New England coast on
Monday when the post-tropical low approaches that area.

Nate should continue to move quickly north-northeastward to
northeastward within the mid-latitude westerlies during the
next 24 to 36 hours. The cyclone is forecast to turn
east-northeastward by Tuesday before it merges with the frontal
system.

This is the last NHC advisory on Nate. Heavy rainfall associated
with Nate is expected to spread over the Tennessee Valley, the
southern and central Appalachians, and the Ohio Valley during the
next day or so. Future information on Nate system can be found in
Public Advisories issued by the Weather Prediction Center beginning
at 5 PM EDT, under AWIPS header TCPAT1, WMO header WTNT31 KWNH, and
on the web at http://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov. These advisories will
continue as long as Nate poses a flooding threat to the U.S.

KEY MESSAGES:

1. Nate will bring heavy rainfall of 3 to 6 inches with isolated
totals of 10 inches east of the Mississippi River from the central
Gulf Coast into the Deep South, eastern Tennessee Valley, and
southern Appalachians through Monday, resulting in the potential for
flash flooding in these areas.

2. Moisture from Nate interacting with a frontal zone will also
bring 2 to 5 inches of rain with isolated totals of 7 inches across
the Ohio Valley and central Appalachians Sunday and Monday, which
will increase the risk for flash flooding across these locations.

3. Wind gusts to tropical storm force are expected over portions of
the Florida Panhandle, Alabama, and Georgia through this afternoon.

4. Persistent onshore flow will keep water levels elevated along
portions of the northern Gulf coast through today.

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
----------------------
WIND: Tropical-storm-force wind gusts are expected over the
the Florida Panhandle, and portions of Alabama and Georgia through
this afternoon.

STORM SURGE: Water levels remain elevated along portions of the
northern Gulf coast, but should gradually subside this afternoon.

RAINFALL: Nate is expected to produce the following rain
accumulations through Monday:

East of the Mississippi River from the central Gulf Coast into the
Deep South, eastern Tennessee Valley, and southern Appalachians:
3 to 6 inches, max 10 inches.

Across the Ohio Valley into the central Appalachians:
2 to 5 inches, max 7 inches.

TORNADOES: A couple tornadoes will be possible today, mainly from
the Florida Panhandle and eastern Alabama across western and
northern Georgia into the western Carolinas.

SURF: Swells generated by Nate will affect land areas around the
Gulf of Mexico through this evening. These swells are likely
to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions. Please
consult products from your local weather office.


NEXT ADVISORY
-------------
This is the last public advisory issued by the National Hurricane
Center on this system.
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